Mhealth interventions for treatment adherence and outcomes of care for cardiometabolic disease among adults living with hiv: Systematic review

Oluwakemi Ololade Odukoya*, Chidumga Ohazurike, Maxwell Akanbi, Linda C. O'Dwyer, Brenda Isikekpei, Ewemade Kuteyi, Idaomeh O. Ameh, Olanlesi Osadiaye, Khadijat Adebayo, Adewunmi Usinoma, Ajoke Adewole, Nkiruka Odunukwe, Kola Okuyemi, Andre Pascal Kengne

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The success of antiretroviral therapy has led to an increase in life expectancy and an associated rise in the risk of cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) among people living with HIV. Objective: Our aim was to conduct a systematic review to synthesize the existing literature on the patterns of use and effects of mobile health (mHealth) interventions for improving treatment adherence and outcomes of care for CMD among people living with HIV. Methods: A systematic search of multiple databases, including PubMed-MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science, African Journals online, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization Global Index Medicus of peer-reviewed articles, was conducted with no date or language restrictions. Unpublished reports on mHealth interventions for treatment adherence and outcomes of care for CMD among adults living with HIV were also included in this review. Studies were included if they had at least 1 component that used an mHealth intervention to address treatment adherence or 1 or more of the stated outcomes of care for CMD among people living with HIV. Results: Our search strategy yielded 1148 unique records. In total, 10 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Of the 10 studies, only 4 had published results. The categories of mHealth interventions ranged from short messaging, telephone calls, and wearable devices to smartphone and desktop web-based mobile apps. Across the different categories of interventions, there were no clear patterns in terms of consistency in the use of a particular intervention, as most studies (9/10, 90%) assessed a combination of mHealth interventions. Short messaging and telephone calls were however the most common interventions. Half of the studies (5/10, 50%) reported on outcomes that were indirectly linked to CMD, and none of them provided reliable evidence for evaluating the effectiveness of mHealth interventions for treatment adherence and outcomes of care for CMD among people living with HIV. Conclusions: Due to the limited number of studies and the heterogeneity of interventions and outcome measures in the studies, no definitive conclusions could be drawn on the patterns of use and effects of mHealth interventions for treatment adherence and outcomes of care for CMD among people living with HIV. We therefore recommend that future trials should focus on standardized outcomes for CMD. We also suggest that future studies should consider having a longer follow-up period in order to determine the long-term effects of mHealth interventions on CMD outcomes for people living with HIV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20330
JournalJMIR mHealth and uHealth
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Cardiometabolic disease
  • Desktop
  • HIV
  • Mhealth
  • Mobile
  • Mobile apps
  • Smartphones
  • Systematic review
  • Telephone calls
  • Text messaging
  • Wearable devices
  • Web-based

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

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