Mindfulness based stress reduction adapted for depressed disadvantaged women in an urban Federally Qualified Health Center

Inger E. Burnett-Zeigler*, Maureen D. Satyshur, Sunghyun Hong, Amy Yang, Judith T. Moskowitz, Katherine L. Wisner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background In this study we examine the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of mindfulness based stress reduction adapted for delivery in an urban Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC). Methods Thirty-one African- American adult women ages 18–65 with depressive symptoms enrolled to participate in an 8-week mindfulness group intervention. The primary outcome (depression) and secondary outcomes (stress, mindfulness, functioning, well-being, and depression stigma) were assessed at baseline, 8 and 16-weeks. Results Depressive symptoms significantly decreased from baseline to 16 weeks. A significant decrease in stress and significant increase in mindfulness was found from baseline to 8 weeks and baseline to 16 weeks. Additionally, aspects of well-being—self-acceptance and growth—significantly increased from baseline to 8-weeks. Stigma significantly increased from baseline to 8 weeks and significantly decreased from 8 to 16 weeks (all p's < 0.05). Conclusions Mindfulness-based interventions implemented in FQHCs may increase access to effective treatments for mental health symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-67
Number of pages9
JournalComplementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Volume25
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Disadvantaged
  • Mental health
  • Mindfulness
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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