Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (MI-TLIF): Surgical technique, long-term 4-year prospective outcomes, and complications compared with an open TLIF cohort

Albert P. Wong, Zachary Adam Smith, James A. Stadler, Xue Yu Hu, Jia Zhi Yan, Xin Feng Li, Ji Hyun Lee, Larry T. Khoo*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an important surgical option for the treatment of back pain and radiculopathy. The minimally invasive TLIF (MI-TLIF) technique is increasingly used to achieve neural element decompression, restoration of segmental alignment and lordosis, and bony fusion. This article reviews the surgical technique, outcomes, and complications in a series of 144 consecutive 1- and 2-level MI-TLIFs in comparison with an institutional control group of 54 open traditional TLIF procedures with a mean of 46months' follow-up. The evidence base suggests that MI-TLIF can be performed safely with excellent long-term outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-304
Number of pages26
JournalNeurosurgery clinics of North America
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • Minimally invasive spine
  • Minimally invasive surgery
  • Spine surgery outcomes
  • TLIF
  • TLIF complications
  • Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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