Model B3.1 for multi-decade concrete creep and shrinkage: Calibration by combined laboratory and bridge data

R. Wendner*, Zdenek P Bazant, M. H. Hubler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent comparisons with numerous data on excessive multi-decade deflections of segmentally erected prestressed box girder bridges revealed the need for recalibration of RILEM B3 model for creep and shrinkage of concrete. With this aim, data from 69 large bridge spans have already been collected at the time of writing but a joint effort of Northwestern University and RILEM TC-MDC. The NU-ITI Laboratory Database has been updated by new data from JSCE, Japan, and a large collection of datasets for modern concretes containing admixtures. Extensive sensitivity analysis of the dependence of model B3 parameters on the material composition and strength is presented. The laboratory data are weighted, with emphasis on long-time tests, particularly the 30-year laboratory tests of Brooks. Combined optimization of both the bridge and laboratory data leads to better formulae of model B3.1 for predicting creep and shrinkage parameters from material strength and composition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLife-Cycle and Sustainability of Civil Infrastructure Systems - Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE 2012
Pages1407-1413
Number of pages7
StatePublished - Oct 17 2012
Event3rd International Symposium on Life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE 2012 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: Oct 3 2012Oct 6 2012

Other

Other3rd International Symposium on Life-Cycle Civil Engineering, IALCCE 2012
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period10/3/1210/6/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality

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