Moderate financial incentive does not appear to influence the P300 Concealed Information Test (CIT) effect in the Complex Trial Protocol (CTP) version of the CIT in a forensic scenario, while affecting P300 peak latencies and behavior

Joel P Rosenfeld*, Evan Sitar, Joshua Wasserman, Anne Ward

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous research indicated that the skin conductance response (SCR) of the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) in the Concealed Information Test (CIT) is typically increased in subjects who are financially and otherwise incentivized to defeat the CIT (the paradoxical “motivational impairment” effect). This is not the case for RT-based CITs, nor for P300 tests based on the 3-stimulus protocol or Complex Trial Protocol for detection of cognitive malingering (although these are not the same as forensic CITs). The present report extends earlier studies of malingerers by running five groups of subjects (15–16 per group yielding 78 total) in a mock crime (forensic) scenario: paid (to beat the test) and unpaid, instructed and uninstructed, and simply guilty. There was no evidence that the “CIT effect” (probe-minus-irrelevant P300 differences) differed among groups, although behavioral differences among groups were seen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-49
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume125
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • Complex Trial Protocol
  • Incentive
  • Motivation
  • P300 CIT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

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