Molecular analysis of 24 alagille syndrome families identifies a single submicroscopic deletion and further localizes the alagille region within 20p12

E. B. Rand*, N. B. Spinner, D. A. Piccoli, P. F. Whitington, R. Taub

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Alagille syndrome (AGS) is a clinically defined disorder characterized by cholestatic liver disease with bile duct paucity, peculiar facies, structural heart defects, vertebral anomalies, and ocular abnormalities. Multiple patients with various cytogenetic abnormalities involving 20p12 have been identified, allowing the assignment of AGS to this region. The presence of interstitial deletions of varying size led to the hypothesis that AGS is a contiguous gent deletion syndrome. This molecular analysis of cytogenetically normal AGS patients was performed in order to test this hypothesis and to refine the localization of the known AGS region. Investigation of inheritance of simple tandem repeat polymorphism alleles in 67 members of 24 cytogenetically normal Alagille families led to the identification of a single submicroscopic deletion. The deletion included loci D20S61, D20S41, D20S186, and D20S188 and presumably intervening uninformative loci D20S189 and D20S27. The six deleted loci are contained in a single YAC of 1.9 Mb. The additional finding of multiple unrelated probands who are heterozygous at each locus demonstrates that microdeletions at known loci within the AGS region are rare in cytogenetically normal patients with this disorder. This suggests that the majority of cases of AGS may be the result of a single gent defect rather than a contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1068-1073
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of human genetics
Volume57
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

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