Molecular screening in a longitudinal cohort of young men who have sex with men and young transgender women: Associations with focus on the emerging sexually transmitted pathogen Mycoplasma genitalium

Erik Munson, Ethan Morgan, Laura Sienkiewicz, Yazmine Thomas, Kathleen Buehler, Daniel Ryan, Antonia Clifford, Brian Mustanski*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives This investigation sought to characterise risk factors associated with acquisition of traditional and emerging agents of sexually transmitted infection (STI) in a cohort of young men who have sex with men and transgender women. Methods 917 participants provided urine and rectal swab submissions assessed by transcription-mediated amplification (TMA)-based assays for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and by off-label TMA-based Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma genitalium testing. A subset provided specimens at 6-month and 12-month follow-up visits. Results Prevalence of M. genitalium from rectal and urine specimens (21.7% and 8.9%, respectively) exceeded that of C. trachomatis (8.8% and 1.6%) and other STI agents. Black participants yielded higher prevalence of M. genitalium (30.6%) than non-black participants (17.0%; χ²=22.39; p<0.0001). M. genitalium prevalence from rectal specimens was 41.5% in HIV-positive participants vs 16.3% in HIV-negative participants (χ²=57.72; p<0.0001). Participant age, gender identity, condomless insertive anal/vaginal sexual practice and condomless receptive anal sexual practice were not associated with rectal C. trachomatis (p≥0.10), N. gonorrhoeae (p≥0.29), T. vaginalis (p≥0.18) or M. genitalium (p≥0.20) detection. While prevalence of T. vaginalis was calculated at ≤1.0%, baseline rectal and urine screening status was predictive of detection/non-detection at follow-up. A non-reactive M. genitalium baseline rectal or urine screening result was less predictive of non-reactive follow-up versus C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis. Conclusions Rectal M. genitalium detection is associated with black race and HIV seropositivity. Baseline M. genitalium infection influences subsequent detection of the organism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)434-440
Number of pages7
JournalSexually Transmitted Infections
Volume97
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2021

Keywords

  • gay men
  • public health
  • sexual health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

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