Motives for Alcohol and Marijuana Use as Predictors of Use and Problem Use Among Young Adult College Students

Akilah Patterson, Milkie Vu, Regine Haardörfer, Michael Windle, Carla J. Berg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined (a) differences between alcohol-only users and alcohol–marijuana co-users and (b) motives for use in relation to alcohol and marijuana use and problem use. Spring 2016 data among 1,870 past 4-month alcohol users (63.6% female, 69.1% White) from seven Georgia colleges/universities were analyzed cross-sectionally and with regard to problem use measured 4 months later. Correlates of co-use (n = 345; vs. alcohol-only use, n = 1,525) included greater alcohol and marijuana use frequency, problem drinking and marijuana use, and alcohol use motives (p’s <.05). Controlling for covariates, alcohol use frequency correlated with greater marijuana use frequency and Coping and Self-enhancement alcohol use motives, but lower Conformity alcohol use motives (p’s <.001); greater Coping and Self-enhancement alcohol use motives (p’s <.01) predicted problem alcohol use. Marijuana use frequency correlated with greater Coping and Expansion marijuana use motives (p’s <.05); greater Expansion marijuana use motives (p =.005) predicted problem marijuana use. College-based substance use interventions should target Coping and Self-enhancement alcohol use motives and Expansion marijuana use motives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-377
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Drug Issues
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2020

Keywords

  • alcohol use
  • college students
  • marijuana use
  • problem use
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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