Movement matters: Effects of motion and mimicry on perception of similarity and closeness in robot-mediated communication

Mina Choi, Rachel Kornfield, Leila Takayama, Bilge Mutlu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

In face-to-face interaction, moving with and mimicking the body movements of communication partners has been widely demonstrated to affect interpersonal processes, including feelings of affiliation and closeness. In this paper, we examine effects of movement and mimicry in robot-mediated communication. Participants were instructed to get to know their partner, a confederate, who interacted with them via a telepresence robot. The robot either (a) mimicked the participant's body orientation (mimicry condition), (b) mimicked pre-recorded movements of another participant (random movement condition), or (c) did not move during the interaction (static condition). Results showed that mimicry and random movement had similar effects on participants' perceptions of similarity and closeness to their partners and that these effects depend on the participant's gender and level of self-monitoring. The findings suggest that the social movements of a telepresence robot affect interpersonal processes and that these effects are shaped by individual differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Subtitle of host publicationExplore, Innovate, Inspire
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages325-335
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9781450346559
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2017 - Denver, United States
Duration: May 6 2017May 11 2017

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Volume2017-May

Other

Other2017 ACM SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2017
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period5/6/175/11/17

Keywords

  • Affiliation
  • Closeness
  • Mimicry
  • Movement
  • Nonverbal behavior
  • Robot-mediated communication
  • Similarity
  • Telepresence robots

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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