Multisite randomized trial of a single-session versus multisession literacy-sensitive self-care intervention for patients with heart failure

Darren A. Dewalt*, Dean Schillinger, Bernice Ruo, Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, David W. Baker, George M. Holmes, Morris Weinberger, Aurelia MacAbasco-O'Connell, Kimberly Broucksou, Victoria Hawk, Kathleen L. Grady, Brian Erman, Carla A. Sueta, Patricia P. Chang, Crystal Wiley Cene, Jia Rong Wu, Christine D. Jones, Michael Pignone

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background-Self-care training can reduce hospitalization for heart failure (HF), and more intensive intervention may benefit more vulnerable patients, including those with low literacy. Methods and Results-A 1-year, multisite, randomized, controlled comparative effectiveness trial with 605 patients with HF was conducted. Those randomized to a single session received a 40-minute in-person, literacy-sensitive training; the multisession group received the same initial training and then ongoing telephone-based support. The primary outcome was combined incidence of all-cause hospitalization or death; secondary outcomes included HF-related hospitalization and HF-related quality of life, with prespecified stratification by literacy. Overall, the incidence of all-cause hospitalization and death did not differ between intervention groups (incidence rate ratio, 1.01; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.22). The effect of multisession training compared with single-session training differed by literacy group: Among those with low literacy, the multisession training yielded a lower incidence of all-cause hospitalization and death (incidence rate ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-1.25), and among those with higher literacy, the multisession intervention yielded a higher incidence (incidence rate ratio, 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.50; interaction P=0.048). For HF-related hospitalization, among those with low literacy, multisession training yielded a lower incidence (incidence rate ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-1.12), and among those with higher literacy, it yielded a higher incidence (incidence rate ratio, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-1.88; interaction P=0.005). HF-related quality of life improved more for patients receiving multisession than for those receiving single-session interventions at 1 and 6 months, but the difference at 12 months was smaller. Effects on HF-related quality of life did not differ by literacy. Conclusions-Overall, an intensive multisession intervention did not change clinical outcomes compared with a single-session intervention. People with low literacy appear to benefit more from multisession interventions than people with higher literacy. Clinical Trial Registration-URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00378950.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2854-2862
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume125
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 12 2012

Keywords

  • heart failure
  • literacy
  • self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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