Nanomechanics based theory of size effect on strength, lifetime and residual strength distributions of quasibrittle failure: A review

Marco Salviato, Kedar Kirane, Zdenek P Bazant

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The paper reviews a series of studies at Northwestern University which led to the establishment of a theory of probability distributions of short-time strength, residual strength after static preload and lifetime of structures made of quasibrittle materials such as concrete, fiber composites and tough ceramics. The theory is based on the frequency of probability of interatomic bond breaks on the atomic scale and on the multi-scale transition of power-law probability tail. The conclusion is that if the failure is not perfectly brittle, the probability distribution of strength and lifetime is a graft of Gaussian and Weibull distributions and varies from nearly Gaussian at the scale of one RVE to Weibullian for very large structures consisting of many RVEs. As a consequence, the safety factors should depend on structure size. Numerous experimental comparisons and computational simulations are given.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication12th International Conference on Applications of Statistics and Probability in Civil Engineering, ICASP 2015
PublisherUniversity of British Columbia
ISBN (Electronic)9780888652454
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Event12th International Conference on Applications of Statistics and Probability in Civil Engineering, ICASP 2012 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: Jul 12 2015Jul 15 2015

Other

Other12th International Conference on Applications of Statistics and Probability in Civil Engineering, ICASP 2012
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period7/12/157/15/15

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Statistics and Probability

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