Narcissistic features in young adolescents: Relations to aggression and internalizing symptoms

Jason J. Washburn*, Susan D. McMahon, Cheryl A. King, Mark A. Reinecke, Carrie Silver

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent research and theory suggest narcissistic features contribute to aggression in adults. The present study examined the association of narcissistic features with aggression and internalizing symptoms in 233 students of 5th-8th grade at three inner-city schools. A factor analysis of the Narcissistic Personality Inventory in this sample revealed three factors: Adaptive Narcissism, Exploitativeness, and Exhibitionism. Regression analyses were used to predict the association of these three narcissistic features with self-, teacher-, and peer-reported aggression and self-reported internalizing symptoms. Results indicate narcissistic exploitativeness positively predicted self-reported proactive aggression, and narcissistic exhibitionism positively predicted internalizing symptoms. Narcissism and self-esteem interacted to predict teacher-reported aggression and self-reported internalizing symptoms. Results are discussed in the context of existing theories of narcissism, threatened egotism, and self-perception bias.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-260
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2004

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Internalizing
  • Narcissism
  • Urban African American adolescent

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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