Narrative and rhetoric in Odysseus' tales to the phaeacians

Marianne I Hopman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

As Odysseus cautiously prepares to enter the straits plagued by Charybdis and Scylla, he encourages his crew by referring to his earlier success against the Cyclops (Od. 12.208-12). This article argues that the Odyssey constructs the Scylla adventure as a tale of heroic failure in contrast with the Cyclops episode. Special attention is paid to narrative paradigms that underlie the Scylla episode and emphasize Odysseus' inability to defeat the monster. I further show that the Cyclops/Scylla contrast serves both as an argument presented to Odysseus' internal Phaeacian audience and an interpretive key for the external audience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-30
Number of pages30
JournalAmerican Journal of Philology
Volume133
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 16 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Classics
  • Cultural Studies
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

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