Nasal Dysbiosis in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Is Characterized by Shifts in Relative Abundances of Non-Staphylococcus Bacteria

Madeline J. Hooper, Tessa M. LeWitt, Francesca L. Veon, Yanzhen Pang, George E. Chlipala, Leo Feferman, Stefan J. Green, Dagmar Sweeney, Katherine T. Bagnowski, Michael B. Burns, Patrick C. Seed, Joan Guitart, Xiaolong A. Zhou*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The nasal microbiome of patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) remains unexplored despite growing evidence connecting nasal bacteria to skin health and disease. Nasal swabs from 45 patients with CTCL (40 with mycosis fungoides, 5 with Sézary syndrome) and 20 healthy controls from the same geographical region (Chicago Metropolitan Area, Chicago, IL) were analyzed using sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA and tuf2 gene amplicons. Nasal α-diversity did not differ between mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome and healthy controls (Shannon index, genus level, P = 0.201), but distinct microbial communities were identified at the class (R2 = 0.104, P = 0.023) and order (R2 = 0.0904, P = 0.038) levels. Increased relative abundance of the genera Catenococcus, Vibrio, Roseomonas, Acinetobacter, and unclassified Clostridiales was associated with increased skin disease burden (P < 0.005, q < 0.05). Performed to accurately resolve nasal Staphylococcus at the species level, tuf2 gene amplicon sequencing revealed no significant differences between mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome and healthy controls. Although S. aureus has been shown to worsen CTCL through its toxins, no increase in the relative abundance of this taxon was observed in nasal samples. Despite the lack of differences in Staphylococcus, the CTCL nasal microbiome was characterized by shifts in numerous other bacterial taxa. These data add to our understanding of the greater CTCL microbiome and provide context for comprehending nasal-skin and host‒tumor‒microbial relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number100132
JournalJID Innovations
Volume2
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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