National trends and racial differences in late preterm induction

Karna Murthy*, Jane L. Holl, Todd A. Lee, William A. Grobman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the trends and racial differences in late preterm induction (LPI) of labor in the United States. Study Design: Data from the National Vital Statistics System were used to identify women eligible for induction between 34 and 42 weeks' gestation from 1991 to 2006. Annual LPI rates were calculated, and maternal race/ethnicity was classified into 4 groups. Changes in the frequency and odds of LPI, stratified by race/ethnicity, were assessed using logistic regression. Results: Among the 42.0 million eligible women, LPI rates increased from 0.46% to 1.37% (P <.01) over 16 years. LPI rates were highest for black women (P <.01) each year, and after adjusting for confounding factors, the odds of LPI were highest (P <.01) and rose most rapidly (P <.01) for black women (non-Hispanic white: odds ratio [OR], 1 [referent]; Hispanic white: OR, 0.76; black: OR, 1.31; other: OR, 0.81; P <.01). Conclusion: LPI rates were persistently highest and rose most rapidly for black women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)458.e1-458.e7
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume205
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • induction of labor
  • late preterm
  • obstetrics
  • racial difference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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