Neighborhood isolation in Chicago: Violent crime effects on structural isolation and homophily in inter-neighborhood commuting networks

Corina Graif*, Alina Lungeanu, Alyssa M. Yetter

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Urban sociologists and criminologists have long been interested in the link between neighborhood isolation and crime. Yet studies have focused predominantly on the internal dimension of social isolation (i.e., increased social disorganization and insufficient jobs and opportunities). This study highlights the need to assess the external dimension of neighborhood isolation, the disconnectedness from other neighborhoods in the city. Analyses of Chicago's neighborhood commuting network over twelve years (2002–2013) showed that violence predicted network isolation. Moreover, pairwise similarity in neighborhood violence predicted commuting ties, supporting homophily expectations. Violence homophily affected tie formation most, while neighborhood violence was important in dissolving ties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-59
Number of pages20
JournalSocial Networks
Volume51
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Commuting
  • Homophily
  • Neighborhood networks
  • Social isolation
  • TERGM
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Anthropology
  • Psychology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Neighborhood isolation in Chicago: Violent crime effects on structural isolation and homophily in inter-neighborhood commuting networks'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this