Network synchronization landscape reveals compensatory structures, quantization, and the positive effect of negative interactions

Takashi Nishikawa*, Adilson E. Motter

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

114 Scopus citations

Abstract

Synchronization, in which individual dynamical units keep in pace with each other in a decentralized fashion, depends both on the dynamical units and on the properties of the interaction network. Yet, the role played by the network has resisted comprehensive characterization within the prevailing paradigm that interactions facilitating pairwise synchronization also facilitate collective synchronization. Here we challenge this paradigm and show that networks with best complete synchronization, least coupling cost, and maximum dynamical robustness, have arbitrary complexity but quantized total interaction strength, which constrains the allowed number of connections. It stems from this characterization that negative interactions as well as link removals can be used to systematically improve and optimize synchronization properties in both directed and undirected networks. These results extend the recently discovered compensatory perturbations in metabolic networks to the realm of oscillator networks and demonstrate why "less can be more" in network synchronization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10342-10347
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume107
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 8 2010

Keywords

  • Collective behavior
  • Complex networks
  • Network interactions
  • Nonlinear dynamics
  • Stability analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Network synchronization landscape reveals compensatory structures, quantization, and the positive effect of negative interactions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this