Networked Cooperation: How the European Union Mobilizes Peacekeeping Forces to Project Power Abroad

Marina E. Henke*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

How does the European Union (EU) recruit troops and police to serve in EU peacekeeping missions? This article suggests that pivotal EU member states and EU officials make strategic use of the social and institutional networks within which they are embedded to bargain reluctant states into providing these forces. These networks offer information on deployment preferences, facilitate side-payments and issue-linkages, and provide for credible commitments. EU operations are consequently not necessarily dependent on intra-EU preference convergence—as is often suggested in the existing literature. Rather, EU force recruitment hinges on highly proactive EU actors, which use social and institutional ties to negotiate fellow states into serving in an EU missions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)901-934
Number of pages34
JournalSecurity Studies
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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