Neuromechanical sensor fusion yields highest accuracies in predicting ambulation mode transitions for trans-tibial amputees

D. C. Tkach, L. J. Hargrove

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Advances in battery and actuator technology have enabled clinical use of powered lower limb prostheses such as the BiOM Powered Ankle. To allow ambulation over various types of terrains, such devices rely on built-in mechanical sensors or manual actuation by the amputee to transition into an operational mode that is suitable for a given terrain. It is unclear if mechanical sensors alone can accurately modulate operational modes while voluntary actuation prevents seamless, naturalistic gait. Ensuring that the prosthesis is ready to accommodate new terrain types at first step is critical for user safety. EMG signals from patient's residual leg muscles may provide additional information to accurately choose the proper mode of prosthesis operation. Using a pattern recognition classifier we compared the accuracy of predicting 8 different mode transitions based on (1) prosthesis mechanical sensor output (2) EMG recorded from residual limb and (3) fusion of EMG and mechanical sensor data. Our findings indicate that the neuromechanical sensor fusion significantly decreases errors in predicting 10 mode transitions as compared to using either mechanical sensors or EMG alone (2.3±0.7% vs. 7.8±0.9% and 20.2±2.0% respectively).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
Pages3074-3077
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 31 2013
Event2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013 - Osaka, Japan
Duration: Jul 3 2013Jul 7 2013

Other

Other2013 35th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2013
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period7/3/137/7/13

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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