Neuromuscular electrical stimulation during task-oriented exercise improves arm function for an individual with proximal arm dysfunction after stroke

Lois Deming Hedman*, Jane E Sullivan, Marjorie Johnson Hilliard, Deborah M. Brown

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This case report examined the effectiveness of a home program using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) during voluntary task-oriented exercise to achieve functional and impairment improvements for an individual with primarily proximal arm paresis after a stroke. The subject initially achieved a Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) score of 58/66, but she reported minimal functional use of her involved, dominant arm. The 6-wk intervention consisted of NMES-assisted task practice involving repetitive reaching for and manipulation of small objects for three daily 15-min sessions. The subject applied NMES to the deltoid and triceps brachii muscles to augment shoulder flexion and abduction and elbow extension during task practice. Outcome measures included the FMA, the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and the Motor Activity Log Quality of Movement subscale (MAL-QOM). The FMA remained unchanged, but the ARAT and MAL-QOM showed improvements, from the beginning to the conclusion of the intervention, that were maintained at 6-wk follow-up.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-596
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume86
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

Keywords

  • Electrical stimulation
  • Exercise
  • Physical therapy
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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