Neurophysiology study of early visual processing of face and non-face recognition under simulated prosthetic vision

Yuan Yang, Hong Guo, Shanbao Tong, Yisheng Zhu, Yihong Qiu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Behavioral researches have shown that the visual function can be partly restored by phosphene-based prosthetic vision for the non-congenital blinds. However, the early visual processing mechanisms of phosphene object recognition is still unclear. This paper aimed to investigate the electro-neurophysiology underlying the phosphene face and non-face recognition. The modulations of latency and amplitude of N170 component in the event-related potential (ERP) were analyzed. Our preliminary results showed that (1) both normal and phosphene face stimuli could elicit prominent N170; nevertheless, phosphene stimuli caused notable latency delay and amplitude suppression on N170 compared with normal stimuli and (2) under phosphene non-face stimuli, a slight but significant latency delay occurred compared with normal stimuli, while amplitude suppression was not observed. Therefore, it was suggested that (1) phosphene perception caused a disruption of the early visual processing for non-canonical images of objects, which was more profound in phosphene face processing; (2) the face-specific processing was reserved under prosthetic vision and (3) holistic processing was the major stage in early visual processing of phosphene face recognition, while part-based processing was attenuated due to the loss of the details.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationEngineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages3952-3955
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781424432967
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Event31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Sep 2 2009Sep 6 2009

Other

Other31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period9/2/099/6/09

Fingerprint

Phosphenes
Neurophysiology
Prosthetics
Processing
Behavioral research
Object recognition
Behavioral Research
Face recognition
Recognition (Psychology)
Evoked Potentials
Modulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Yang, Y., Guo, H., Tong, S., Zhu, Y., & Qiu, Y. (2009). Neurophysiology study of early visual processing of face and non-face recognition under simulated prosthetic vision. In Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009 (pp. 3952-3955). [5333672] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5333672
Yang, Yuan ; Guo, Hong ; Tong, Shanbao ; Zhu, Yisheng ; Qiu, Yihong. / Neurophysiology study of early visual processing of face and non-face recognition under simulated prosthetic vision. Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009. IEEE Computer Society, 2009. pp. 3952-3955
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title = "Neurophysiology study of early visual processing of face and non-face recognition under simulated prosthetic vision",
abstract = "Behavioral researches have shown that the visual function can be partly restored by phosphene-based prosthetic vision for the non-congenital blinds. However, the early visual processing mechanisms of phosphene object recognition is still unclear. This paper aimed to investigate the electro-neurophysiology underlying the phosphene face and non-face recognition. The modulations of latency and amplitude of N170 component in the event-related potential (ERP) were analyzed. Our preliminary results showed that (1) both normal and phosphene face stimuli could elicit prominent N170; nevertheless, phosphene stimuli caused notable latency delay and amplitude suppression on N170 compared with normal stimuli and (2) under phosphene non-face stimuli, a slight but significant latency delay occurred compared with normal stimuli, while amplitude suppression was not observed. Therefore, it was suggested that (1) phosphene perception caused a disruption of the early visual processing for non-canonical images of objects, which was more profound in phosphene face processing; (2) the face-specific processing was reserved under prosthetic vision and (3) holistic processing was the major stage in early visual processing of phosphene face recognition, while part-based processing was attenuated due to the loss of the details.",
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Yang, Y, Guo, H, Tong, S, Zhu, Y & Qiu, Y 2009, Neurophysiology study of early visual processing of face and non-face recognition under simulated prosthetic vision. in Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009., 5333672, IEEE Computer Society, pp. 3952-3955, 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009, Minneapolis, MN, United States, 9/2/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5333672

Neurophysiology study of early visual processing of face and non-face recognition under simulated prosthetic vision. / Yang, Yuan; Guo, Hong; Tong, Shanbao; Zhu, Yisheng; Qiu, Yihong.

Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009. IEEE Computer Society, 2009. p. 3952-3955 5333672.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - Behavioral researches have shown that the visual function can be partly restored by phosphene-based prosthetic vision for the non-congenital blinds. However, the early visual processing mechanisms of phosphene object recognition is still unclear. This paper aimed to investigate the electro-neurophysiology underlying the phosphene face and non-face recognition. The modulations of latency and amplitude of N170 component in the event-related potential (ERP) were analyzed. Our preliminary results showed that (1) both normal and phosphene face stimuli could elicit prominent N170; nevertheless, phosphene stimuli caused notable latency delay and amplitude suppression on N170 compared with normal stimuli and (2) under phosphene non-face stimuli, a slight but significant latency delay occurred compared with normal stimuli, while amplitude suppression was not observed. Therefore, it was suggested that (1) phosphene perception caused a disruption of the early visual processing for non-canonical images of objects, which was more profound in phosphene face processing; (2) the face-specific processing was reserved under prosthetic vision and (3) holistic processing was the major stage in early visual processing of phosphene face recognition, while part-based processing was attenuated due to the loss of the details.

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SP - 3952

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BT - Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society

PB - IEEE Computer Society

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Yang Y, Guo H, Tong S, Zhu Y, Qiu Y. Neurophysiology study of early visual processing of face and non-face recognition under simulated prosthetic vision. In Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Engineering the Future of Biomedicine, EMBC 2009. IEEE Computer Society. 2009. p. 3952-3955. 5333672 https://doi.org/10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5333672