Neuropsychological Status and Social Problem Solving in Children with Congenital or Acquired Brain Dysfunction

Seth Warschausky*, Angela Giacoletti Argento, Edward Hurvitz, Michelle Berg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To describe the associations between neuropsychological variables and social problem-solving skills in children with congenital versus acquired brain dysfunction. Participants: Twenty-two children and adolescents with cerebral palsy or myelomeningocele (developmental condition, or DC) and 22 with history of traumatic brain injury (TBI), ages 7-12 years, IQ > 70. Measures: Social Problem-Solving Measure (SPSM), Video Cues and Consequences (VCC), and brief motor-free neuropsychological assessment. Results: The DC group generated significantly fewer solutions to hypothetical problematic social scenarios than the TBI group, but differences in the relative frequencies of solution types were minimal. The pattern of associations between neuropsychological and social problem-solving variables differed between groups. Conclusions: Neuropsychological status may contribute to development and expression of aspects of social skills, but there may be subtle differences in the nature of that contribution in children with congenital versus acquired brain lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-254
Number of pages5
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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