New combined tetanus-diptheria-acellular pertussis vaccines for adults: Primary care physician attitudes and preferences

Matthew M. Davis*, Katrina Kretsinger, Anne E. Cowan, Shannon Stokley, Sarah J. Clark

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Availability of combined tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines for adults offers a new pertussis prevention strategy for the US. Successful uptake of Tdap vaccine will depend partly on the attitudes and practices of primary care physicians, including their experience with Td boosters. We conducted a mail survey in August 2005 of a national random sample of 399 family physicians (FPs) and 399 general internists (IMs) to assess practices related to Td boosters, clinical experience with pertussis, and attitudes toward a potential Tdap vaccine recommendation for adults. The response rate was 49% (52% FPs, 46% IMs). Among 336 eligible respondents, half reported having clinical experience with pertussis. Most (81%) would recommend Tdap vaccine for their adult patients, and 73% support targeting adults likely to come in close contact with infants. Attitudes toward a potential Tdap vaccine recommendation differed by whether providers stock and administer Td boosters. We conclude that adult primary care providers in the US are likely to recommend Tdap vaccine to their adult patients, in concordance with recent national recommendations. Future research should assess the extent to which barriers impede adoption of Tdap vaccine recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-134
Number of pages5
JournalHuman vaccines
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

Keywords

  • Adult vaccines
  • Pertussis
  • Physician attitudes
  • Tdap

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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