New developments in the use of biologics and other modalities in the management of lateral epicondylitis

Cynthia A. Kahlenberg*, Michael Knesek, Michael A. Terry

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lateral epicondylitis is a common source of elbow pain. Though it is often a self-limited condition, refractory lateral epicondylitis can lead to problems with activities of daily living and sometimes requires sick leave from work. Therefore prompt treatment is essential. Histopathologic studies have suggested that lateral epicondylitis is a tendinopathy, associated with apoptosis and autophagy, rather than a tendonitis associated with inflammation. Although corticosteroids have been used for short-term treatment, recent studies have suggested that they are not helpful and may even be harmful and delay healing in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Researchers have recently begun to investigate the use of biologics as potential treatment options for lateral epicondylitis. Autologous blood preparations including platelet rich plasma (PRP) and autologous whole blood injections (ABIs) have been proposed in order to deliver growth factors and other nutrients to the diseased tendon. Stem cell therapies have also been suggested as a method of improving tendon healing. This review discusses the current evidence for the use of PRP, ABI, and stem cell therapies for treatment of lateral epicondylitis. We also review the evidence for nonbiologic treatments including corticosteroids, prolotherapy, botulinum toxin A, and nitric oxide.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number439309
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2015
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Tennis Elbow
Biological Products
Blood
Tendons
Platelets
Stem cells
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Plasmas
Tendinopathy
Type A Botulinum Toxins
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Refractory materials
Nutrients
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Nitric Oxide
Stem Cells
Therapeutics
Apoptosis
Sick Leave

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

@article{46272686141f49f99a4d43cacd89c1d8,
title = "New developments in the use of biologics and other modalities in the management of lateral epicondylitis",
abstract = "Lateral epicondylitis is a common source of elbow pain. Though it is often a self-limited condition, refractory lateral epicondylitis can lead to problems with activities of daily living and sometimes requires sick leave from work. Therefore prompt treatment is essential. Histopathologic studies have suggested that lateral epicondylitis is a tendinopathy, associated with apoptosis and autophagy, rather than a tendonitis associated with inflammation. Although corticosteroids have been used for short-term treatment, recent studies have suggested that they are not helpful and may even be harmful and delay healing in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Researchers have recently begun to investigate the use of biologics as potential treatment options for lateral epicondylitis. Autologous blood preparations including platelet rich plasma (PRP) and autologous whole blood injections (ABIs) have been proposed in order to deliver growth factors and other nutrients to the diseased tendon. Stem cell therapies have also been suggested as a method of improving tendon healing. This review discusses the current evidence for the use of PRP, ABI, and stem cell therapies for treatment of lateral epicondylitis. We also review the evidence for nonbiologic treatments including corticosteroids, prolotherapy, botulinum toxin A, and nitric oxide.",
author = "Kahlenberg, {Cynthia A.} and Michael Knesek and Terry, {Michael A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1155/2015/439309",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2015",
journal = "BioMed Research International",
issn = "2314-6133",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

New developments in the use of biologics and other modalities in the management of lateral epicondylitis. / Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.; Knesek, Michael; Terry, Michael A.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2015, 439309, 01.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - New developments in the use of biologics and other modalities in the management of lateral epicondylitis

AU - Kahlenberg, Cynthia A.

AU - Knesek, Michael

AU - Terry, Michael A.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Lateral epicondylitis is a common source of elbow pain. Though it is often a self-limited condition, refractory lateral epicondylitis can lead to problems with activities of daily living and sometimes requires sick leave from work. Therefore prompt treatment is essential. Histopathologic studies have suggested that lateral epicondylitis is a tendinopathy, associated with apoptosis and autophagy, rather than a tendonitis associated with inflammation. Although corticosteroids have been used for short-term treatment, recent studies have suggested that they are not helpful and may even be harmful and delay healing in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Researchers have recently begun to investigate the use of biologics as potential treatment options for lateral epicondylitis. Autologous blood preparations including platelet rich plasma (PRP) and autologous whole blood injections (ABIs) have been proposed in order to deliver growth factors and other nutrients to the diseased tendon. Stem cell therapies have also been suggested as a method of improving tendon healing. This review discusses the current evidence for the use of PRP, ABI, and stem cell therapies for treatment of lateral epicondylitis. We also review the evidence for nonbiologic treatments including corticosteroids, prolotherapy, botulinum toxin A, and nitric oxide.

AB - Lateral epicondylitis is a common source of elbow pain. Though it is often a self-limited condition, refractory lateral epicondylitis can lead to problems with activities of daily living and sometimes requires sick leave from work. Therefore prompt treatment is essential. Histopathologic studies have suggested that lateral epicondylitis is a tendinopathy, associated with apoptosis and autophagy, rather than a tendonitis associated with inflammation. Although corticosteroids have been used for short-term treatment, recent studies have suggested that they are not helpful and may even be harmful and delay healing in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. Researchers have recently begun to investigate the use of biologics as potential treatment options for lateral epicondylitis. Autologous blood preparations including platelet rich plasma (PRP) and autologous whole blood injections (ABIs) have been proposed in order to deliver growth factors and other nutrients to the diseased tendon. Stem cell therapies have also been suggested as a method of improving tendon healing. This review discusses the current evidence for the use of PRP, ABI, and stem cell therapies for treatment of lateral epicondylitis. We also review the evidence for nonbiologic treatments including corticosteroids, prolotherapy, botulinum toxin A, and nitric oxide.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84935034238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84935034238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2015/439309

DO - 10.1155/2015/439309

M3 - Review article

C2 - 26114106

AN - SCOPUS:84935034238

VL - 2015

JO - BioMed Research International

JF - BioMed Research International

SN - 2314-6133

M1 - 439309

ER -