Non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma in persons with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is associated with increased serum levels of IL10, or the IL10 promoter -592 C/C genotype

Elizabeth Crabb Breen*, W. John Boscardin, Roger Detels, Lisa P. Jacobson, Michael W. Smith, Stephen J. O'Brien, Joan S. Chmiel, Charles R. Rinaldo, Shenghan Lai, Otoniel Martínez-Maza

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interleukin-10 (IL10) may contribute to the development of non-Hodgkin's B cell lymphoma, especially in the context of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), where lymphoma incidence is greatly increased. Utilizing specimens from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) obtained prior to diagnosis of AIDS-associated lymphoma, detectable serum human IL10 was seen much more frequently in lymphoma cases (n = 61, 26%) compared to CD4-matched AIDS controls (5%, P = 0.004), or to HIV-infected (2%, P = 0.002) or HIV uninfected subjects (0%, P = 0.0003). In longitudinal studies, detectable IL10 occurred at times closest to but preceding lymphoma diagnosis (P = 0.01). In an independent genetic analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the promoter region of the IL10 gene in 1157 MACS subjects, a high IL10-expressing genotype (-592 C/C) was overrepresented among lymphoma subjects (P = 0.009), even when controlling for race (P = 0.006). These results suggest that elevated serum IL10 or the IL10 promoter -592 C/C genotype are associated with development of AIDS lymphoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-129
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Immunology
Volume109
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

Keywords

  • AIDS
  • B cell
  • Cytokine
  • Genotype
  • Haplotype
  • Interleukin-10
  • Lymphoma
  • Predictor
  • Serum
  • Single-nucleotide polymorphism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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