Not All Hemangiomas Look Like Strawberries: Uncommon Presentations of the Most Common Tumor of Infancy

D. Martinez-Perez, N. A. Fein, L. M. Boon, J. B. Mulliken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract: The typical appearance of cutaneous hemangiomas of infancy is well known. We studied unusual manifestations of this common tumor. We reviewed over 500 hemangiomas in the registry of the Vascular Anomalies Program at Boston Children's Hospital. We found four uncommon morphologic variations: deep hemangiomas with normal overlying skin (n = 12); macular hemangiomas with a port‐wine stainlike appearance (n = 6); bossed hemangiomas with telangiectasia and peripheral patlor (n = 5); and hemangiomas with persistent fast flow (n = 3). Deep and superficial (macular) varieties regressed at a normal rate. Telangiectatic (bossed) hemangiomas, however, invotuted rapidly, usualiy before 1 year of age. Hemangiomas with persistent fast flow required either resection or sclerotherapy for complications in early childhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric dermatology
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Dermatology

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