Novel detection schemes of nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging: Applications from analytical chemistry to molecular sensors

Elad Hare*, Leif Schröder, Shoujun Xu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a well-established analytical technique in chemistry. The ability to precisely control the nuclear spin interactions that give rise to the NMR phenomenon has led to revolutionary advances in fields as diverse as protein structure determination and medical diagnosis. Here, we discuss methods for increasing the sensitivity of magnetic resonance experiments, moving away from the paradigm of traditional NMR by separating the encoding and detection steps of the experiment. This added flexibility allows for diverse applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip flow imaging and biological sensors to optical detection of magnetic resonance imaging at low magnetic fields.We aim to compare and discuss various approaches for a host of problems in material science, biology, and physics that differ from the high-field methods routinely used in analytical chemistry and medical imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnual Review of Analytical Chemistry
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Keywords

  • Atomic magnetometer
  • Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST)
  • Flow imaging
  • Low field
  • Microfluidics
  • Molecular imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

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