Novel experimental techniques for damage evaluation in the fracture process zone in concrete and rock

Stuart E. Swartz*, Surendra P. Shah

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

The fracture of concrete is characterized by formation and propagation of a fracture process zone (FPZ). Several phenomena have been associated with the FPZ, including microcracking around the crack tip and crack bridging. The existence of the FPZ provides toughening resulting in an R-curve type of behavior. Materials which exhibit such a response are often termed quasi-brittle. Only if the size of the FPZ is small compared to the dimensions of the test specimen or the structural element, can one use classical linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to characterize fracture in such materials as cement-based composites, some rocks and some ceramics. The set of four articles presented here by members of the SEM subdivision on Fracture of Concrete and Rock discuses novel experimental techniques to observe the FPZ. The first two articles deal with viewing and measuring damage on the boundary of the test specimen (free surface). The last two articles deal with measurement techniques to evaluate damage within the specimen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Volume15
No3
Specialist publicationExperimental Techniques
StatePublished - May 1 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Materials Science (miscellaneous)

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