Obesity, Sarcopenia, and Outcomes in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

Karam Khaddour*, Sandra L. Gomez-Perez, Nikita Jain, Jyoti D. Patel, Yanis Boumber

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Body composition refers to the proportional content of body fat mass and lean body mass that can lead to a continuum of different phenotypes ranging from cachectic/sarcopenic state to obesity. The heterogenetic phenotypes of body composition can contribute to formation of some cancer types and can sometimes lead to disparate outcomes. Both of these extremes of the spectrum exist in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The discovery of new pathways that drive tumorigenesis contributing to cancer progression and resistance have expanded our understanding of cancer biology leading to development of new targeted therapies including tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) that have changed the landscape of NSCLC treatment. However, in the new era of precision medicine, the impact of body composition phenotypes on treatment outcomes and survival is now being elucidated. In this review, we will discuss the emerging evidence of a link between body composition and outcomes in patients with NSCLC treated with TKI and ICI. We will also discuss suggested mechanisms by which body composition can impact tumor behavior and anti-tumor immunological response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number576314
JournalFrontiers in Oncology
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2020

Keywords

  • body composition
  • immune checkpoint inhibitor
  • non-small cell lung cancer
  • obesity
  • overall survival
  • sarcopenia
  • tyrosine kinase inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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