Obesity Status on associations between cancer-related beliefs and health behaviors in cancer survivors: Implications for patient-clinician communication

Annie W. Lin*, Sara H. Marchese, Laura E. Finch, Tammy Stump, Kara L. Gavin, Bonnie Spring

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Associations between cancer beliefs and health behavior engagement are largely unexplored in cancer survivors, particularly among those with overweight and obesity. We investigated belief-behavior associations for cancer survivors, and whether obesity altered these associations. Methods: Cancer survivors were identified from the National Cancer Institute HINTS Survey 5 data and classified as having had an obesity-related cancer or not. Linear and multiple logistic regression analyses examined whether cancer risk beliefs and self-efficacy predicted dining out behaviors and physical activity (PA). Restricted analyses were conducted in those with overweight or obesity. Results: Low self-efficacy to take care of one's health was associated with longer sitting time in the overall sample (p = 0.04). In cancer survivors with overweight or obesity, engagement in healthier behaviors was associated with 1) feeling less overwhelmed by cancer risk recommendations and 2) believing that PA or obesity influences cancer development (both p < 0.05). Among those with overweight and obesity, associations between cancer beliefs and health behaviors were not significantly different by cancer type (obesity-related vs. not). Conclusions: Obesity altered associations between cancer risk beliefs and health behavior engagement from the overall sample. Practice Implications: Weight status may be a useful tailoring factor when delivering health-promoting interventions for cancer survivors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2067-2072
Number of pages6
JournalPatient education and counseling
Volume104
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Diet
  • Health beliefs
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Surveys

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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