Observations of cold antihydrogen

J. N. Tan, N. S. Bowden, G. Gabrielse*, P. Oxley, A. Speck, C. H. Storry, M. Wessels, D. Grzonka, W. Oelert, G. Schepers, T. Sefzick, J. Walz, H. Pittner, T. W. Hänsch, E. A. Hessels

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

ATRAP's e+ cooling of p in a nested Penning trap has led to reports of cold H produced during such cooling by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations. To observe H, ATHENA uses coincident annihilation detection and ATRAP uses field ionization followed by p storage. Advantages of ATRAP's field ionization method include the complete absence of any background events, and the first way to measure which H states are produced. ATRAP enhances the H production rate by driving many cycles of e+ cooling in the nested trap, with more H counted in an hour than the sum of all the other antimatter atoms ever reported. The number of H counted per incident high energy p is also higher than ever observed. The first measured distribution of H states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions. The high rate and the high Rydberg states suggest that the H is formed via three-body recombination, as expected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-30
Number of pages9
JournalNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms
Volume214
Issue numberSUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004
EventLow Energy Antiproton Physics (LEAP'03) - Jamashita-park, Japan
Duration: Mar 3 2003Mar 7 2003

Keywords

  • Antihydrogen
  • Field ionization
  • Nested Penning trap
  • Positron cooling
  • Recombination in cold plasma
  • Rydberg atom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics
  • Instrumentation

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