Officially advocated, but institutionally undermined: Diversity rhetoric and subjective realities of junior faculty of color

Victoria C. Plaut*, Stephanie A. Fryberg, Ernesto Javier Martínez

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to explicitly link the experiences of junior faculty of color with the cultural and structural realities that surround them in academia. Specifically, the paper is divided into three parts. The first part interrogates university practices and ideologies that serve to institutionally undermine faculty diversity. The second part tackles the stereotype of junior faculty of color as " strugglers," or as having a high likelihood of not meeting tenure expectations. Finally, we illustrate a variety of subjective experiences of junior faculty of color, stemming from these processes, including experiences of job satisfaction and commitment to the university. Throughout the paper, we supplement the theoretical analysis with preliminary data from an on-going survey of junior faculty of color.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-116
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Diversity ideologies
  • Faculty diversity
  • Job satisfaction
  • Junior faculty of color
  • Stereotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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