On the Boundaries of Framing Terrorism: Guilt, Victimization, and the 2016 Orlando Shooting

Nathan Walter*, Thomas J. Billard, Sheila T. Murphy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The 2016 Orlando shooting offers an intriguing lens through which to evaluate the boundaries of media frames in the interpretation of terrorism. Using an experimental design (N = 243), the current study investigated the effects of two dominant frames—the homophobic hate crime and the Islamic terrorist frame—on collective guilt, collective victimization, and pro–lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) political action. In addition, political partisanship and social network diversity were evaluated as potential moderators. Compared to the Islamic terrorist frame, exposure to the homophobic hate crime frame increased collective guilt and decreased collective victimization, subsequently enhancing support for the LGBTQ community. Moreover, social network diversity was shown to override the framing effect, as individuals who reported high diversity were more likely to sign a petition in solidarity with the LGBTQ community, irrespective of frame condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)849-868
Number of pages20
JournalMass Communication and Society
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

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