On the processing of canonical word order during eye fixations in reading: Do readers process transposed word previews?

Keith Rayner*, Bernhard Angele, Elizabeth R. Schotter, Klinton Bicknell

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Whether readers always identify words in the order they are printed is subject to considerable debate. In the present study, we used the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975) to manipulate the preview for a two-word target region (e.g., white walls in My neighbor painted the white walls black). Readers received an identical (white walls), transposed (walls white), or unrelated preview (vodka clubs). We found that there was a clear cost of having a transposed preview compared to an identical preview, indicating that readers cannot or do not identify words out of order. However, on some measures, the transposed preview condition did lead to faster processing than the unrelated preview condition, suggesting that readers may be able to obtain some useful information from a transposed preview. Implications of the results for models of eye movement control in reading are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-381
Number of pages29
JournalVisual Cognition
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Eye movements
  • Parafoveal processing
  • Preview benefit
  • Reading
  • Word order

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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