One for the road: Public transportation, alcohol consumption, and intoxicated driving

Clement Kirabo Jackson*, Emily Greene Owens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

We exploit arguably exogenous train schedule changes in Washington DC to investigate the relationship between public transportation, the risky decision to consume alcohol, and the criminal decision to engage in alcohol-impaired driving. Using variation over time, across days of the week, and over the course of the day, we provide evidence that overall there was little effect of expanded public transit service on DUI arrests, alcohol related fatal traffic and alcohol related arrests. However, we find that these overall effects mask considerable heterogeneity across geographic areas. Specifically, we find that areas where bars are within walking distance to transit stations experience increases in alcohol related arrests and decreases in DUI arrests. We observe no sign of behavioral changes in neighborhoods without any bars within walking distance of transit stations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-121
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Public Economics
Volume95
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

Keywords

  • Alcohol consumption
  • Drunk driving
  • Public transportation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance
  • Economics and Econometrics

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