Onset timing, thoughts of self-harm, and diagnoses in postpartum women with screen-positive depression findings

Katherine L. Wisner*, Dorothy K Y Sit, Mary C. McShea, David M. Rizzo, Rebecca A. Zoretich, Carolyn L. Hughes, Heather F. Eng, James F. Luther, Stephen R. Wisniewski, Michelle L. Costantino, Andrea L. Confer, Eydie L. Moses-Kolko, Christopher S. Famy, Barbara H. Hanusa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

301 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Importance: The period prevalence of depression among women is 21.9% during the first postpartum year; however, questions remain about the value of screening for depression. Objectives: To screen for depression in postpartum women and evaluate positive screen findings to determine the timing of episode onset, rate and intensity of self-harm ideation, and primary and secondary DSM-IV disorders to inform treatment and policy decisions. Design: Sequential case series of women who recently gave birth. Setting: Urban academic women's hospital. Participants: During the maternity hospitalization, women were offered screening at 4 to 6 weeks post partum by telephone. Screen-positive women were invited to undergo psychiatric evaluations in their homes. Main Outcomes and Measures: A positive screen finding was an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of 10 or higher. Self-harm ideation was assessed on EPDS item 10: "The thought of harming myself has occurred to me" (yes, quite often; sometimes; hardly ever; never). Screen-positive women underwent evaluation with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for Axis I primary and secondary diagnoses. Results: Ten thousand mothers underwent screening, with positive findings in 1396 (14.0%); of these, 826 (59.2%) completed the home visits and 147 (10.5%) completed a telephone diagnostic interview. Screen-positive women were more likely to be younger, African American, publicly insured, single, and less well educated. More episodes began post partum (40.1%), followed by during pregnancy (33.4%) and before pregnancy (26.5%). In this population, 19.3% had self-harm ideation. All mothers with the highest intensity of self-harm ideation were identified with the EPDS score of 10 or higher. The most common primary diagnoses were unipolar depressive disorders (68.5%), and almost two-thirds had comorbid anxiety disorders. A striking 22.6% had bipolar disorders. Conclusions and Relevance: The most common diagnosis in screen-positive women was major depressive disorder with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. Strategies to differentiate women with bipolar from unipolar disorders are needed. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00282776.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-498
Number of pages9
JournalJAMA Psychiatry
Volume70
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Postpartum Period
Depression
Postpartum Depression
Anxiety Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Mothers
Interviews
Pregnancy
House Calls
Major Depressive Disorder
Depressive Disorder
Telephone
African Americans
Psychiatry
Hospitalization
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parturition
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Wisner, Katherine L. ; Sit, Dorothy K Y ; McShea, Mary C. ; Rizzo, David M. ; Zoretich, Rebecca A. ; Hughes, Carolyn L. ; Eng, Heather F. ; Luther, James F. ; Wisniewski, Stephen R. ; Costantino, Michelle L. ; Confer, Andrea L. ; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L. ; Famy, Christopher S. ; Hanusa, Barbara H. / Onset timing, thoughts of self-harm, and diagnoses in postpartum women with screen-positive depression findings. In: JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 ; Vol. 70, No. 5. pp. 490-498.
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abstract = "Importance: The period prevalence of depression among women is 21.9{\%} during the first postpartum year; however, questions remain about the value of screening for depression. Objectives: To screen for depression in postpartum women and evaluate positive screen findings to determine the timing of episode onset, rate and intensity of self-harm ideation, and primary and secondary DSM-IV disorders to inform treatment and policy decisions. Design: Sequential case series of women who recently gave birth. Setting: Urban academic women's hospital. Participants: During the maternity hospitalization, women were offered screening at 4 to 6 weeks post partum by telephone. Screen-positive women were invited to undergo psychiatric evaluations in their homes. Main Outcomes and Measures: A positive screen finding was an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of 10 or higher. Self-harm ideation was assessed on EPDS item 10: {"}The thought of harming myself has occurred to me{"} (yes, quite often; sometimes; hardly ever; never). Screen-positive women underwent evaluation with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for Axis I primary and secondary diagnoses. Results: Ten thousand mothers underwent screening, with positive findings in 1396 (14.0{\%}); of these, 826 (59.2{\%}) completed the home visits and 147 (10.5{\%}) completed a telephone diagnostic interview. Screen-positive women were more likely to be younger, African American, publicly insured, single, and less well educated. More episodes began post partum (40.1{\%}), followed by during pregnancy (33.4{\%}) and before pregnancy (26.5{\%}). In this population, 19.3{\%} had self-harm ideation. All mothers with the highest intensity of self-harm ideation were identified with the EPDS score of 10 or higher. The most common primary diagnoses were unipolar depressive disorders (68.5{\%}), and almost two-thirds had comorbid anxiety disorders. A striking 22.6{\%} had bipolar disorders. Conclusions and Relevance: The most common diagnosis in screen-positive women was major depressive disorder with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. Strategies to differentiate women with bipolar from unipolar disorders are needed. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00282776.",
author = "Wisner, {Katherine L.} and Sit, {Dorothy K Y} and McShea, {Mary C.} and Rizzo, {David M.} and Zoretich, {Rebecca A.} and Hughes, {Carolyn L.} and Eng, {Heather F.} and Luther, {James F.} and Wisniewski, {Stephen R.} and Costantino, {Michelle L.} and Confer, {Andrea L.} and Moses-Kolko, {Eydie L.} and Famy, {Christopher S.} and Hanusa, {Barbara H.}",
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Wisner, KL, Sit, DKY, McShea, MC, Rizzo, DM, Zoretich, RA, Hughes, CL, Eng, HF, Luther, JF, Wisniewski, SR, Costantino, ML, Confer, AL, Moses-Kolko, EL, Famy, CS & Hanusa, BH 2013, 'Onset timing, thoughts of self-harm, and diagnoses in postpartum women with screen-positive depression findings', JAMA Psychiatry, vol. 70, no. 5, pp. 490-498. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.87

Onset timing, thoughts of self-harm, and diagnoses in postpartum women with screen-positive depression findings. / Wisner, Katherine L.; Sit, Dorothy K Y; McShea, Mary C.; Rizzo, David M.; Zoretich, Rebecca A.; Hughes, Carolyn L.; Eng, Heather F.; Luther, James F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Costantino, Michelle L.; Confer, Andrea L.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Famy, Christopher S.; Hanusa, Barbara H.

In: JAMA Psychiatry, Vol. 70, No. 5, 01.01.2013, p. 490-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Onset timing, thoughts of self-harm, and diagnoses in postpartum women with screen-positive depression findings

AU - Wisner, Katherine L.

AU - Sit, Dorothy K Y

AU - McShea, Mary C.

AU - Rizzo, David M.

AU - Zoretich, Rebecca A.

AU - Hughes, Carolyn L.

AU - Eng, Heather F.

AU - Luther, James F.

AU - Wisniewski, Stephen R.

AU - Costantino, Michelle L.

AU - Confer, Andrea L.

AU - Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.

AU - Famy, Christopher S.

AU - Hanusa, Barbara H.

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Importance: The period prevalence of depression among women is 21.9% during the first postpartum year; however, questions remain about the value of screening for depression. Objectives: To screen for depression in postpartum women and evaluate positive screen findings to determine the timing of episode onset, rate and intensity of self-harm ideation, and primary and secondary DSM-IV disorders to inform treatment and policy decisions. Design: Sequential case series of women who recently gave birth. Setting: Urban academic women's hospital. Participants: During the maternity hospitalization, women were offered screening at 4 to 6 weeks post partum by telephone. Screen-positive women were invited to undergo psychiatric evaluations in their homes. Main Outcomes and Measures: A positive screen finding was an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of 10 or higher. Self-harm ideation was assessed on EPDS item 10: "The thought of harming myself has occurred to me" (yes, quite often; sometimes; hardly ever; never). Screen-positive women underwent evaluation with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for Axis I primary and secondary diagnoses. Results: Ten thousand mothers underwent screening, with positive findings in 1396 (14.0%); of these, 826 (59.2%) completed the home visits and 147 (10.5%) completed a telephone diagnostic interview. Screen-positive women were more likely to be younger, African American, publicly insured, single, and less well educated. More episodes began post partum (40.1%), followed by during pregnancy (33.4%) and before pregnancy (26.5%). In this population, 19.3% had self-harm ideation. All mothers with the highest intensity of self-harm ideation were identified with the EPDS score of 10 or higher. The most common primary diagnoses were unipolar depressive disorders (68.5%), and almost two-thirds had comorbid anxiety disorders. A striking 22.6% had bipolar disorders. Conclusions and Relevance: The most common diagnosis in screen-positive women was major depressive disorder with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. Strategies to differentiate women with bipolar from unipolar disorders are needed. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00282776.

AB - Importance: The period prevalence of depression among women is 21.9% during the first postpartum year; however, questions remain about the value of screening for depression. Objectives: To screen for depression in postpartum women and evaluate positive screen findings to determine the timing of episode onset, rate and intensity of self-harm ideation, and primary and secondary DSM-IV disorders to inform treatment and policy decisions. Design: Sequential case series of women who recently gave birth. Setting: Urban academic women's hospital. Participants: During the maternity hospitalization, women were offered screening at 4 to 6 weeks post partum by telephone. Screen-positive women were invited to undergo psychiatric evaluations in their homes. Main Outcomes and Measures: A positive screen finding was an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score of 10 or higher. Self-harm ideation was assessed on EPDS item 10: "The thought of harming myself has occurred to me" (yes, quite often; sometimes; hardly ever; never). Screen-positive women underwent evaluation with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV for Axis I primary and secondary diagnoses. Results: Ten thousand mothers underwent screening, with positive findings in 1396 (14.0%); of these, 826 (59.2%) completed the home visits and 147 (10.5%) completed a telephone diagnostic interview. Screen-positive women were more likely to be younger, African American, publicly insured, single, and less well educated. More episodes began post partum (40.1%), followed by during pregnancy (33.4%) and before pregnancy (26.5%). In this population, 19.3% had self-harm ideation. All mothers with the highest intensity of self-harm ideation were identified with the EPDS score of 10 or higher. The most common primary diagnoses were unipolar depressive disorders (68.5%), and almost two-thirds had comorbid anxiety disorders. A striking 22.6% had bipolar disorders. Conclusions and Relevance: The most common diagnosis in screen-positive women was major depressive disorder with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. Strategies to differentiate women with bipolar from unipolar disorders are needed. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00282776.

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