Ontogenetic changes in glial fibrillary acid protein phosphorylation, glutamate uptake and glutamine synthetase activity in olfactory bulb of rats

Cíntia Eickhoff Battú, Graça F R S Godinho, Ana Paula Thomazi, Lúcia M V De Almeida, Carlos Alberto Gonçalves, Trícia Kommers, Susana T. Wofchuk*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Phosphorylation of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in hippocampal and cerebellar slices from immature rats is stimulated by glutamate. This effect occurs via a group II metabotropic glutamate receptor in the hippocampus and an NMDA ionotropic receptor in the cerebellum. We investigated the glutamate modulation of GFAP phosphorylation in the olfactory bulb slices of Wistar rats of different ages (post-natal day 15 = P15, post-natal day 21 = P21 and post-natal day 60 = P60). Our results showed that glutamate stimulates GFAP phosphorylation in young animals and this is mediated by NMDA receptors. We also observed a decrease in glutamate uptake at P60 compared to P15, a finding similar to that found in the hippocampus. The activity of glutamine synthetase was elevated after birth, but was found to decrease with development from P21 to P60. Together, these data confirm the importance of glutamatergic transmission in the olfactory bulb, its developmental regulation in this brain structure and extends the concept of glial involvement in glutamatergic neuron-glial communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1101-1108
Number of pages8
JournalNeurochemical Research
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2005

Keywords

  • Brain development
  • GFAP
  • Glutamate uptake
  • Glutamine synthetase
  • NMDA
  • Olfactory bulb

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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