Optimal Deformation Modes for Estimating Soil Properties

Anastasia Nally, Zhenhao Shi, James Paul Hambleton

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Accurate estimation of soil mechanical properties represents a crucial step for most engineering applications. Both in situ and laboratory testing fundamentally rest on mechanically deforming (actuating) the material and simultaneously measuring its response in terms of displacements and stresses (reactions). Facing this widely adopted scheme, key questions remain unanswered: 1) what is the optimal type and/or mode of actuation that can most effectively extract soil properties; 2) what types of measurements are most useful for inferring material constants? As a first step in the investigation of these questions, an inverse model for the direct simple shear (DSS) test is constructed, wherein measurable responses are used to back-calculate soil properties. Specimens with two different aspect ratios are considered to study the influence of the deformation mode. The effect of the choice of measurements (i.e., which displacements and/or stresses are observed) is explored by assessing inverse model performance considering the DSS test as a boundary value problem, with variable displacement and stress fields, versus the conventional interpretation as an elemental test. Parameter sensitivities and correlation coefficients are employed as quantifiable metrics to compare material characterization based on different aspect ratios and types of measurements, and to interpret the performance of inverse analysis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-550
Number of pages10
JournalGeotechnical Special Publication
Volume2019-March
Issue numberGSP 310
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Event8th International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering: Geotechnical Materials, Modeling, and Testing, Geo-Congress 2019 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Mar 24 2019Mar 27 2019

Fingerprint

soil property
shear test
Soils
Aspect ratio
inverse analysis
stress field
Boundary value problems
mechanical property
engineering
Mechanical properties
Testing
material
soil
laboratory
test
parameter
effect
measuring
in situ

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Architecture
  • Building and Construction
  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology

Cite this

Nally, Anastasia ; Shi, Zhenhao ; Hambleton, James Paul. / Optimal Deformation Modes for Estimating Soil Properties. In: Geotechnical Special Publication. 2019 ; Vol. 2019-March, No. GSP 310. pp. 541-550.
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Optimal Deformation Modes for Estimating Soil Properties. / Nally, Anastasia; Shi, Zhenhao; Hambleton, James Paul.

In: Geotechnical Special Publication, Vol. 2019-March, No. GSP 310, 01.01.2019, p. 541-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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