Optimal DNA tier for the IRT/DNA algorithm determined by CFTR mutation results over 14years of newborn screening

Mei W. Baker, Molly Groose, Gary Hoffman, Michael Rock, Hara Levy, Philip M. Farrell*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: There has been great variation and uncertainty about how many and what CFTR mutations to include in cystic fibrosis (CF) newborn screening algorithms, and very little research on this topic using large populations of newborns. Methods: We reviewed Wisconsin screening results for 1994-2008 to identify an ideal panel. Results: Upon analyzing approximately 1 million screening results, we found it optimal to use a 23 CFTR mutation panel as a second tier when an immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT)/DNA algorithm was applied for CF screening. This panel in association with a 96th percentile IRT cutoff gave a sensitivity of 97.3%, but restricting the DNA tier to F508del was associated with 90% (P < 0001). Conclusions: Although CFTR panel selection has been challenging, our data show that a 23 mutation method optimizes sensitivity and is advantageous. The IRT cutoff value, however, is actually more critical than DNA in determining CF newborn screening sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-281
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Cystic Fibrosis
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator
  • Immunoreactive trypsinogen
  • Sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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