Optimal enteral feeding in children with gastric dysfunction: surgical jejunostomy vs image-guided gastrojejunal tube placement

Mehul V. Raval, J. Duncan Phillips*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Long-term feeding access in children who fail initial gastrostomy is a management quandary. Although image-guided gastrojejunal feeding tube placement (IGJ) is becoming the access of choice in many centers, few studies have compared long-term results with surgical jejunostomy (SJ). The authors compare outcomes with these 2 techniques. Method: A retrospective review of 20 children requiring jejunal feeding access after failing initial gastrostomy was done. Procedures were performed at a tertiary referral center by interventional radiologists (IGJ) or board-certified pediatric surgeons (SJ). Results: Initially, patients underwent IGJ (n = 14) or SJ (n = 6). Image-guided gastrojejunal feeding tube placement patients required gastrostomy at an average age of 23.8 months, with conversion to IGJ an average of 17.2 months later. SJ patients required gastrostomy at average age of 16.2 months, with conversion to SJ 30.7 months later. Of 14 patients undergoing IGJ, 7 (50%) eventually required SJ because of recurring tube management issues. Thus, 13 patients ultimately had SJ, with 11 (85%) Roux-en-Y jejunostomies. Mean operating time for SJ was 158 minutes, with an average of 5.1 days to initiation of feeds, 11 days to full feeds, and 19.9 days to discharge (range, 3-66 days). Image-guided gastrojejunal feeding tube placement patients averaged 4.6 tube adjustments per year requiring fluoroscopic guidance. Surgical jejunostomy averaged 1.5 tube adjustments per year requiring outpatient hospital visits. Image-guided gastrojejunal feeding tube placement patients averaged 3.9 hospital d/y secondary to feeding tube management issues, whereas SJ patients averaged 1.4 hospital days per year. Conclusion: In this group of children with long-term jejunal feeding access, half of those with IGJ eventually required SJ. Surgical jejunostomy required fewer adjustments and hospitalizations per year. Although initially more invasive than IGJ, SJ may provide more stable feeding access with fewer complications. This represents the first published report comparing long-term outcomes between IGJ and SJ.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1679-1682
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of pediatric surgery
Volume41
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Keywords

  • Enteral feeding
  • Gastrojejunal feeding tube
  • Gastrostomy
  • Jejunostomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Optimal enteral feeding in children with gastric dysfunction: surgical jejunostomy vs image-guided gastrojejunal tube placement'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this