Optimisation of indices of external pneumatic compression for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis

Radionuclide gated imaging studies

Roger Kamm*, Richard Butcher, Jerry Froelich, Mark Johnson, Edwin Salzman, Ascher Shapiro, H. William Strauss

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: The amoun and rate of blood expelled with different modes of intermitten external pneumatic compression applied to the lower leg were studied on a regional basis in a series of experiments on healthy human volunteers. Radionuclide imaging of the labelled blood pool, with acquisition of counts synchronised to the pressurisation cycle, provided data on regional blood volumes in the leg in relation to time. To determine the changes in blood volume of the lower leg resulting from external pneumatic compression labelled red blood cell counts were determined during 10 different types of compression cycle. Since venous stasis is considered to be a major cause of venous thrombosis the red blood cell counts were used to calculate regional values of the fraction of blood ejected as well as comparative indices proportional to regional flow rate, regional velocity, and regional wall shear stress. All these indices should be maximised for optimal prophylaxis agains deep vein thrombosis. The four compartmen cuff in each compression mode applied a mean pressure of 45 mm Hg, bu different combinations of values were used for intercompartmental pressure gradation (†p) and for intercompartmental time sequencing to the onse of compression (†t). Uniform compression (†p=0; †t=0) was substantially inferior to cycles with gradation and sequencing. The optimal values of △p were in the range 5-10 mm Hg and of †t in the range 0-0.5 seconds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)588-596
Number of pages9
JournalCardiovascular research
Volume20
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

Fingerprint

Venous Thrombosis
Radionuclide Imaging
Leg
Erythrocyte Count
Blood Volume
Pressure
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • Deep vein thrombosis
  • Pneumatic compression
  • Radionuclide imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Kamm, Roger ; Butcher, Richard ; Froelich, Jerry ; Johnson, Mark ; Salzman, Edwin ; Shapiro, Ascher ; Strauss, H. William. / Optimisation of indices of external pneumatic compression for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis : Radionuclide gated imaging studies. In: Cardiovascular research. 1986 ; Vol. 20, No. 8. pp. 588-596.
@article{3d074bfbeb6f46b0814df3d7469a1bf4,
title = "Optimisation of indices of external pneumatic compression for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis: Radionuclide gated imaging studies",
abstract = "Summary: The amoun and rate of blood expelled with different modes of intermitten external pneumatic compression applied to the lower leg were studied on a regional basis in a series of experiments on healthy human volunteers. Radionuclide imaging of the labelled blood pool, with acquisition of counts synchronised to the pressurisation cycle, provided data on regional blood volumes in the leg in relation to time. To determine the changes in blood volume of the lower leg resulting from external pneumatic compression labelled red blood cell counts were determined during 10 different types of compression cycle. Since venous stasis is considered to be a major cause of venous thrombosis the red blood cell counts were used to calculate regional values of the fraction of blood ejected as well as comparative indices proportional to regional flow rate, regional velocity, and regional wall shear stress. All these indices should be maximised for optimal prophylaxis agains deep vein thrombosis. The four compartmen cuff in each compression mode applied a mean pressure of 45 mm Hg, bu different combinations of values were used for intercompartmental pressure gradation (†p) and for intercompartmental time sequencing to the onse of compression (†t). Uniform compression (†p=0; †t=0) was substantially inferior to cycles with gradation and sequencing. The optimal values of △p were in the range 5-10 mm Hg and of †t in the range 0-0.5 seconds.",
keywords = "Deep vein thrombosis, Pneumatic compression, Radionuclide imaging",
author = "Roger Kamm and Richard Butcher and Jerry Froelich and Mark Johnson and Edwin Salzman and Ascher Shapiro and Strauss, {H. William}",
year = "1986",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/cvr/20.8.588",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "588--596",
journal = "Cardiovascular Research",
issn = "0008-6363",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "8",

}

Optimisation of indices of external pneumatic compression for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis : Radionuclide gated imaging studies. / Kamm, Roger; Butcher, Richard; Froelich, Jerry; Johnson, Mark; Salzman, Edwin; Shapiro, Ascher; Strauss, H. William.

In: Cardiovascular research, Vol. 20, No. 8, 01.01.1986, p. 588-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimisation of indices of external pneumatic compression for prophylaxis against deep vein thrombosis

T2 - Radionuclide gated imaging studies

AU - Kamm, Roger

AU - Butcher, Richard

AU - Froelich, Jerry

AU - Johnson, Mark

AU - Salzman, Edwin

AU - Shapiro, Ascher

AU - Strauss, H. William

PY - 1986/1/1

Y1 - 1986/1/1

N2 - Summary: The amoun and rate of blood expelled with different modes of intermitten external pneumatic compression applied to the lower leg were studied on a regional basis in a series of experiments on healthy human volunteers. Radionuclide imaging of the labelled blood pool, with acquisition of counts synchronised to the pressurisation cycle, provided data on regional blood volumes in the leg in relation to time. To determine the changes in blood volume of the lower leg resulting from external pneumatic compression labelled red blood cell counts were determined during 10 different types of compression cycle. Since venous stasis is considered to be a major cause of venous thrombosis the red blood cell counts were used to calculate regional values of the fraction of blood ejected as well as comparative indices proportional to regional flow rate, regional velocity, and regional wall shear stress. All these indices should be maximised for optimal prophylaxis agains deep vein thrombosis. The four compartmen cuff in each compression mode applied a mean pressure of 45 mm Hg, bu different combinations of values were used for intercompartmental pressure gradation (†p) and for intercompartmental time sequencing to the onse of compression (†t). Uniform compression (†p=0; †t=0) was substantially inferior to cycles with gradation and sequencing. The optimal values of △p were in the range 5-10 mm Hg and of †t in the range 0-0.5 seconds.

AB - Summary: The amoun and rate of blood expelled with different modes of intermitten external pneumatic compression applied to the lower leg were studied on a regional basis in a series of experiments on healthy human volunteers. Radionuclide imaging of the labelled blood pool, with acquisition of counts synchronised to the pressurisation cycle, provided data on regional blood volumes in the leg in relation to time. To determine the changes in blood volume of the lower leg resulting from external pneumatic compression labelled red blood cell counts were determined during 10 different types of compression cycle. Since venous stasis is considered to be a major cause of venous thrombosis the red blood cell counts were used to calculate regional values of the fraction of blood ejected as well as comparative indices proportional to regional flow rate, regional velocity, and regional wall shear stress. All these indices should be maximised for optimal prophylaxis agains deep vein thrombosis. The four compartmen cuff in each compression mode applied a mean pressure of 45 mm Hg, bu different combinations of values were used for intercompartmental pressure gradation (†p) and for intercompartmental time sequencing to the onse of compression (†t). Uniform compression (†p=0; †t=0) was substantially inferior to cycles with gradation and sequencing. The optimal values of △p were in the range 5-10 mm Hg and of †t in the range 0-0.5 seconds.

KW - Deep vein thrombosis

KW - Pneumatic compression

KW - Radionuclide imaging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85047680755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85047680755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/cvr/20.8.588

DO - 10.1093/cvr/20.8.588

M3 - Review article

VL - 20

SP - 588

EP - 596

JO - Cardiovascular Research

JF - Cardiovascular Research

SN - 0008-6363

IS - 8

ER -