Optimizing Mean Arterial Pressure in Acutely Comatose Patients Using Cerebral Autoregulation Multimodal Monitoring With Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

Lucia Rivera-Lara, Romergryko Geocadin, Andres Zorrilla-Vaca, Ryan J. Healy, Batya R. Radzik, Caitlin Palmisano, Marek Mirski, Mirinda Anderson White, Jose Suarez, Charles Brown, Charles Wallace Hogue, Wendy Ziai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether comatose patients with greater duration and magnitude of clinically observed mean arterial pressure outside optimal mean arterial blood pressure have worse outcomes than those with mean arterial blood pressure closer to optimal mean arterial blood pressure calculated by bedside multimodal cerebral autoregulation monitoring using near-infrared spectroscopy. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Neurocritical Care Unit of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. SUBJECTS: Acutely comatose patients secondary to brain injury.None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The cerebral oximetry index was continuously monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy for up to 3 days. Optimal mean arterial blood pressure was defined as that mean arterial blood pressure at the lowest cerebral oximetry index (nadir index) for each 24-hour period of monitoring. Kaplan-Meier analysis and proportional hazard regression models were used to determine if survival at 3 months was associated with a shorter duration of mean arterial blood pressure outside optimal mean arterial blood pressure and the absolute difference between clinically observed mean arterial blood pressure and optimal mean arterial blood pressure. A total 91 comatose patients were enrolled in the study. The most common etiology was intracerebral hemorrhage. Optimal mean arterial blood pressure could be calculated in 89 patients (97%), and the median optimal mean arterial blood pressure was 89.7 mm Hg (84.6-100 mm Hg). In multivariate proportional hazard analysis, duration outside optimal mean arterial blood pressure of greater than 80% of monitoring time (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.04-4.41; p = 0.04) and absolute difference between clinically observed mean arterial blood pressure and optimal mean arterial blood pressure of more than 10 mm Hg (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.21-4.92; p = 0.013) were independently associated with mortality at 3 months, after adjusting for brain herniation, admission Glasgow Coma Scale, duration on vasopressors and midline shift at septum. CONCLUSIONS: Comatose neurocritically ill adults with an absolute difference between clinically observed mean arterial blood pressure and optimal mean arterial blood pressure greater than 10 mm Hg and duration outside optimal mean arterial blood pressure greater than 80% had increased mortality at 3 months. Noninvasive near-infrared spectroscopy-based bedside calculation of optimal mean arterial blood pressure is feasible and might be a promising tool for cerebral autoregulation oriented-therapy in neurocritical care patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1409-1415
Number of pages7
JournalCritical care medicine
Volume47
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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