Oral Reading for Language in Aphasia (ORLA): Evaluating the efficacy of computer-delivered therapy in chronic nonfluent aphasia

Leora R Cherney*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the efficacy of a treatment, Oral Reading for Language in Aphasia (ORLA), delivered by computer to individuals with chronic nonfluent aphasia and compared its efficacy with the same treatment delivered by a speech-language pathologist (SLP). Method: With ORLA, the person with aphasia systematically and repeatedly reads aloud sentences, first in unison and then independently. Following a no-treatment period, 25 individuals with chronic nonfluent aphasia were randomly assigned to receive 24 sessions of ORLA, 1-3 times per week, either by computer or by the SLP. Results: For participants receiving computer ORLA, change made on the Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient (WAB-AQ) during the treatment phase was larger than the change made during the no-treatment phase. Positive effect sizes for change during treatment compared with change during the no-treatment phase were obtained and were benchmarked as medium or large for the WAB-AQ and discourse measures. There was no significant difference between outcomes for computer ORLA compared with SLP-ORLA. Conclusion: Low-intensity ORLA, delivered by computer to individuals with chronic nonfluent aphasia, is efficacious and may be equivalent to ORLA delivered by an SLP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)423-431
Number of pages9
JournalTopics in Stroke Rehabilitation
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • aphasia
  • computers
  • language therapy
  • oral reading
  • rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Rehabilitation
  • Community and Home Care

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