Ordinary economic voting behavior in the extraordinary election of Adolf Hitler

Gary King*, Ori Rosen, Martin Tanner, Alexander F. Wagner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

The enormous Nazi voting literature rarely builds on modern statistical or economic research. By adding these approaches, we find that the most widely accepted existing theories of this era cannot distinguish the Weimar elections from almost any others in any country. Via a retrospective voting account, we show that voters most hurt by the depression, and most likely to oppose the government, fall into separate groups with divergent interests. This explains why some turned to the Nazis and others turned away. The consequences of Hitler's election were extraordinary, but the voting behavior that led to it was not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)951-996
Number of pages46
JournalJournal of Economic History
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ordinary economic voting behavior in the extraordinary election of Adolf Hitler'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this