Organizational “Failure” and Institutional Pluralism

A Case Study of an Urban School Closure

Vontrese Deeds*, Mary E Pattillo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use the framework of institutional pluralism to provide new insights into a controversial process of market-based reform—school closures. School closure is a shock that highlights the dynamics and definitions of failure and surfaces values and meanings that might otherwise be hidden from consideration. Using qualitative data from a closing urban school, we disaggregate stakeholders’ competing conceptions of legitimacy and argue that failure is an interpretive process. We find that this school was closed based on the evaluative criteria of district administrators, occasioning disruptions for teachers, parents, and students that ultimately run counter to some goals of district administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)474-504
Number of pages31
JournalUrban Education
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 10 2015

Fingerprint

pluralism
District Administrator
school
legitimacy
stakeholder
parents
student
district
market
teacher
Values

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • ethnography
  • school reform
  • social
  • subjects
  • urban
  • urban education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

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Organizational “Failure” and Institutional Pluralism : A Case Study of an Urban School Closure. / Deeds, Vontrese; Pattillo, Mary E.

In: Urban Education, Vol. 50, No. 4, 10.06.2015, p. 474-504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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