Orosensory contributions to dysphagia: a link between perception of sweet and sour taste and pharyngeal delay time

Barbara R. Pauloski*, Sazzad M. Nasir

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pharyngeal delay is a significant swallowing disorder often resulting in aspiration. It is suspected that pharyngeal delay originates from sensory impairment, but a direct demonstration of a link between oral sensation and pharyngeal delay is lacking. In this study involving six patients with complaints of dysphagia, taste sensation of the oral tongue was measured and subsequently related to swallowing kinematics. It was found that a response bias for sour taste was significantly correlated with pharyngeal delay time on paste, highlighting oral sensory contributions to swallow motor dysfunctions. Investigating the precise nature of such a link between oral sensation and dysphagia would constitute a basis for understanding the disorder. The results of this study highlight oral sensory contributions to pharyngeal swallow events and provide impetus to examine this link in larger samples of dysphagic patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12752
JournalPhysiological reports
Volume4
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Keywords

  • Citric acid
  • deglutition
  • deglutition disorders
  • sucrose
  • taste perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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