Orthosomnia: Are some patients taking the quantified self too far?

Kelly Glazer Baron*, Sabra Abbott, Nancy Jao, Natalie Manalo, Rebecca Mullen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of wearable sleep tracking devices is rapidly expanding and provides an opportunity to engage individuals in monitoring of their sleep patterns. However, there are a growing number of patients who are seeking treatment for self-diagnosed sleep disturbances such as insufficient sleep duration and insomnia due to periods of light or restless sleep observed on their sleep tracker data. The patients' inferred correlation between sleep tracker data and daytime fatigue may become a perfectionistic quest for the ideal sleep in order to optimize daytime function. To the patients, sleep tracker data often feels more consistent with their experience of sleep than validated techniques, such as polysomnography or actigraphy. The challenge for clinicians is balancing educating patients on the validity of these devices with patients' enthusiasm for objective data. Incorporating the use of sleep trackers into cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia will be important as use of these devices is rapidly expanding among our patient population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-354
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Insomnia
  • Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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