Outcomes Associated with Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome in Critically Ill Children with Hyperglycemia

Lauren E. Marsillio*, Lisa A. Asaro, Vijay Srinivasan, David Wypij, Lauren R. Sorce, Michael S.D. Agus, Vinay M. Nadkarni

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Patterns and outcomes of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome are unknown in critically ill children with hyperglycemia. We aimed to determine whether tight glycemic control to a lower vs. higher range influenced timing, duration, or resolution of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome as well as characterize the clinical outcomes of subgroups of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in children enrolled in the Heart And Lung Failure-Pediatric INsulin Titration trial. Design: Planned secondary analysis of the multicenter Heart And Lung Failure-Pediatric INsulin Titration trial. Setting: Thirty-five PICUs. Patients: Critically ill children with hyperglycemia who received the Heart And Lung Failure-Pediatric INsulin Titration protocol from 2012 to 2016. Interventions: Randomization to a lower versus higher glucose target group. Measurements and Main Results: Of 698 patients analyzed, 48 (7%) never developed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, 549 (79%) had multiple organ dysfunction syndrome without progression, 32 (5%) developed new multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and 69 (10%) developed progressive multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Of those whose multiple organ dysfunction syndrome resolved, 192 (34%) experienced recurrent multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. There were no significant differences in the proportion of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome subgroups between Heart And Lung Failure-Pediatric INsulin Titration glucose target groups. However, patients with new or progressive multiple organ dys function syndrome had fewer ICU-free days through day 28 than those without new or progressive multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and progressive multiple organ dysfunction syndrome patients had fewer ICU-free days than those with new multiple organ dysfunction syndrome: Median 25.1 days for never multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, 20.2 days for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome without progression, 18.6 days for new multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and 0 days for progressive multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (all comparisons p < 0.001). Patients with recurrent multiple organ dysfunction syndrome experienced fewer ICU-free days than those without recurrence (median, 11.2 vs 22.8 d; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Tight glycemic control target range was not associated with differences in the proportion of new, progressive, or recurrent multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. New or progressive multiple organ dysfunction syndrome was associated with poor clinical outcomes, and progressive multiple organ dysfunction syndrome was associated with worse outcomes than new multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. In future studies, new multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and progressive multiple organ dysfunction syndrome may need to be considered separately, as they represent distinct subgroups with different, potentially modifiable risk factors. Patients with recurrent multiple organ dysfunction syndrome represent a newly characterized, high-risk group which warrants attention in future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1147-1156
Number of pages10
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Keywords

  • hyperglycemia
  • mortality
  • multiple organ dysfunction syndrome
  • outcome
  • pediatric intensive care unit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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