Outcomes management, expected treatment response, and severity-adjusted provider profiling in outpatient psychotherapy

Wolfgang Lutz*, Zoran Martinovich, Kenneth I. Howard, Scott C. Leon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To make use of psychotherapy research in practice, therapists need realtime access to valid clinically relevant information about patients. The dose-effect and phase models of psychotherapy provide a theoretical background for empirically based psychotherapy management by describing the systematic nature of progress in therapy and guiding the selection of outcome criteria. Given this theoretical background, it is possible to derive appropriate models for monitoring cases in ongoing therapies (patient profiling) and identifying therapists' relative strengths and weaknesses (severity-adjusted provider profiling). These applied methods may be used to inform decision making in ongoing psychotherapies and to support supervision and clinical training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1291-1304
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume58
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

Fingerprint

Psychotherapy
Outpatients
Therapeutics
Patient Selection
Decision Making
Profiling
Research
Therapy

Keywords

  • Expected treatment response
  • Growth curve models
  • Outcomes management
  • Patient-focused research
  • Therapist performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Outcomes management, expected treatment response, and severity-adjusted provider profiling in outpatient psychotherapy. / Lutz, Wolfgang; Martinovich, Zoran; Howard, Kenneth I.; Leon, Scott C.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 58, No. 10, 01.10.2002, p. 1291-1304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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