Outcomes of parent education programs based on reevaluation counseling

Randi B. Wolfe*, Barton J. Hirsch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report two studies in which a parent education program based on Reevaluation Counseling was field-tested on mothers randomly assigned to treatment groups or equivalent, no-treatment comparison groups. The goal was to evaluate the program's viability, whether there were measurable effects, whether those effects were sustained over time, and whether the program was effective among diverse populations. The first study involved middle income, married mothers (n = 25) with at least one child younger than age five. Eleven members of the no-treatment group participated in the program three months later. Pretest, posttest, and follow-up measures included a parental attitude survey and a parenting stress index. The second study involved 18 black mothers with children enrolled in Head Start. Six members of the no-treatment group participated in the program two months later. Added to the pretest, posttest, and follow-up measures were a parent attitude research instrument and a parenting practices questionnaire. Results were replicated within and across studies. Significant effects suggest that the program can reduce parenting-related stress, improve parental attitudes, and encourage authoritative parenting practices, although some effects tend to diminish somewhat over time. The program appears viable with mothers of various social status groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-76
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

Keywords

  • PSI
  • Parent education
  • Reevaluation Counseling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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